Tahiti & her Islands

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Romance on the beach - discover yourself!

Romance on the beach - discover yourself!

Tahiti and Bora Bora – names that evoke images of beauty, romance, adventure and, above all, sheer escapism. Imagine discovering your own secret paradise – a world of crystal clear aquamarine waters and deserted white-sand beaches, just waiting to be explored. Above all discover yourself and your partner. This is the ideal recipe for a honeymoon in Tahiti – a Paradise on Earth, waiting to be explored !!

The geographic isolation of these islands and the sheer distance in itself has a sense of intrigue and romance to it. This has always been a major attraction for tourists seeking the exotic and romantic allure of this unspoilt natural environment.

Tahiti and Her Islands are over 5700 km from the nearest big landmass (Australia). Sprinkled like a handful of dots on the World’s map their isolation is very clearly visible. Most islands are only sparsely populated and forty of them remain uninhabited to this day.

Aerial view, Bora Bora

Aerial view, Bora Bora

Located in the heart of the Pacific Ocean, French Polynesia covers an area of ​​almost 4 million square kilometers, an area equivalent to that of Europe. However the land above sea is only 4000 km². They are situated half way between California (6,200 km) and Australia (5,700 km). It is approximately 8 hours flight from its nearest landmass. It is in the same timezone as Hawaii, and the same distance south of the equator as Hawaii is north.

If you are travelling to Australia or New Zealand, a few nights stopover in this island paradise is an ideal getaway.

Tahiti’s 118 islands are scattered across five far-flung archipelagoes each with their own particular character.

All the islands, are distinctly different from each other, each one has its own individual charms. Moorea is not Bora Bora and Rangiroa is not Manihi.

Polynesian dance

Polynesian dance

Tahiti, Moorea, Bora Bora – high and mythical islands with deep valleys exhaling the intoxicating perfume of the Tiare (Tahitian flower). IT is indeed a short lived jewel that one wears over the ear.

Rangiroa, Manihi, Fakarava, Tikehau – atolls at the end of the world, these “pearl islands” enclose in their jewellery box lagoons undreamt of universes: magic illuminates the blue depths where time deposits the pearls of Tahiti.

The Polynesian triangle

The Pacific Islands have been successively inhabited by Polynesian navigators: the Marquesas, Hawaii, Easter Island and New Zealand. These populations thus shared the same language and cultural roots and had traditions, and culinary uses based on a similar mythology. The Marquesas Islands was the first to be populated by Polynesians to the 3 rd century AD. The first settlers of the Hawaiian Islands (4500 km north of Tahiti) would be Marquesans who landed between 500 and 800 years after Christ by browsing to the stars. The latter then met the American continent, which marked the end of their exploration of the eastern Pacific. On their return they discovered New Zealand (about AD 800), which they named “Aotearoa” (the land of the long white cloud). Finally, the Marquesas populated Easter Island (Rapa Nui) located 4000 km south-east of the Marquesas.